The world of design is consistently inspired by chairs. Whether the design takes shape with ergonomics or craftsmanship in mind, the quantity of chair designs in circulation is definitely not lacking. But what if the chair never existed? What if designers had no preexisting prototype or blueprint for chairs before creating their own? Martin Luu asked himself those same questions before conceptualizing his own unconventional chair called Sado. Sourcing a type of non-existence as his main inspiration, Luu designed Sado as an experiment in unconventional design and the result proves the singularity that can be achieved without blueprints guiding the way.

Before designing Sado, Luu wondered, “What if the chair as we knew it never existed?” Eliminating all preconceptions regarding chair designs and all their variations, Luu began at ground zero. Speaking to this, Luu says, “As the archetype of the chair had been left unchanged for the past 6,500 years, an exploration was made to find a unique sitting form.” Settling on both a comfortable and distinct sitting form required a complete restructuring of the traditional upright chair and backrest.

Sado’s ultimate form resembles either a horizontal tree log or horseback, suited for a straddled seated position that encourages a healthy posture. Of course, just like more traditional chairs, the final seated position is ultimately decided by the user, or in this case, the sitter. When positioned atop Sado, the chair’s seat rotates freely to enable 360-degree accessibility to nearby objects within arm’s reach. Adjustable leg supports also provide a place for your legs to rest while helping to sustain a leveled spinal position. Constructed from bent steel and maple wood, Sado’s ergonomic structure is rooted in its simple construction and intuitive sitting method.

While I’ve never ridden a bull before, I can imagine if you’re any good at staying on, that core strength and a stable posture are key. While sitting on Sado hopefully won’t result in any jolting or cases of whiplash, it was designed to help strengthen the core muscles and align the spine so that if at any point you were to mount an electric bull, then you’d be duly prepared with a healthy mounting position. Kidding aside, Sado’s ergonomic nature is also reminiscent of sitting on the top backs of working animals like horses and donkeys, reinforcing both the functionality and inventiveness behind Luu’s design.

Designer: Martin Luu

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