When it comes to channelling 1970s soul boy subculture, no two labels are as synonymous with the era as Fred Perry and Nicholas Daley. It’s no surprise, then, that with the serendipitous crossing of paths, the pair has found a mutual interest in the intertwining of contemporary culture and classic craftsmanship.

The pair’s soul singin’ collection is the fourth addition to the Nicholas Daley x Fred Perry cross-over, which has seen the designer launch two music grants for aspiring musicians and host a series of live music nights, most recently at London’s 100 Club. 

Joining forces to merge the traditional design techniques of Fred Perry and the rich, retro colours of Daley’s mainline, the stellar collaborative capsule collection was created to vivaciously celebrate counterculture. Black Midi drummer, Morgan Simpson, poses as the face of the campaign, bridging the gap between the milieu of days past and the spirit of modern soul boy music. 

The collection features exclusive artwork from London-based artist, Gaurab Thakali, apparent in the chain stitch embroidery detailing throughout. Elsewhere, the warmth of ecru, milky blue, navy, cabernet and roasted pecan are woven into a two-pocket polo, a vertically-striped button-up, a lightweight jacket, a bold, contrast hem overshirt and more – through the interconnectedness of style and music, it’s a joyous celebration of British subculture. 

By channelling the groove and funk that made the retro sound so special, the garms are perfect for partying the blues away with your mates. With references to pivotal R&B and soul icons who embodied the zeitgeist of the ’70s such as Isaac Hayes, Lonnie Liston Smith and Earth, Wind & Fire – all of whom mirrored the same liberation as their soul boy counterparts – the edit is an homage to a legendary scene. Looks like it’s time to jam out to your dad’s old records!

Photography by Piczo. Shop the collection here

fredperry.com

The post Nicholas Daley’s Latest Fred Perry Collab Celebrates 1970s Soul Boy Subculture appeared first on 10 Magazine.

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