A revised and updated version of Process: Visual Journeys in Graphic Design has been released today from Counterprint. Building on the popularity of the hugely successful first edition by design studio BankerWessel, this new version contains two further case studies.

Beloved by designers for its contents which revealed the rarely seen sketches and processes behind the making of marks and logotypes, ‘Process’ is based on the work created by BankerWessel. A total of 12 projects are presented in this second edition, including two never before seen case studies and a written piece by designer Richard Baird titled ‘In Search of Originality’.

As well as containing 1,500 individual sketched with attached annotations which show the thought processes present during their creation, the book also includes logo marks for a range of companies within the realms of art, music and fashion, such as Hasselblad Foundation and Fotografiska.

This level of professional industry insight will be music to the ears of graphic designers. While the clean and polished results of a finished logo mark are inspiring in and of themselves, there is much to be learnt by studying the decisions which didn’t get chosen. Studios can sometimes withhold these details to preserve the integrity of their work or the image of a brand, so to have such transparency from BankerWessel is a welcome move.

“Making things look good is part of [a designer’s] profession,” says Counterprint in a statement. “But this book is not about final results. It is about the process. The process can be messy and perhaps therefore quite seldom assembled and presented. But it is intriguing to look behind the scenes.”

With the profession of graphic design continuing to change and evolve over recent decades thanks to digitisation and the emergence of faster-paced tools, there’s never been a better time to put the industry and its mechanics under the microscope. With this rapid change creating a gap between generations and artificial intelligence, there are a lot of questions facing designers working today and those who aspire to such a position.

These questions include: what is a designer’s role in this new age? Is there a higher level of craftsmanship worth reaching for? And what can human designers bring to the table that AI and robots simply fail to deliver? These questions are beyond straightforward answers, but by raising them, BankerWessel invites discussion, which can only serve to benefit graphic designers as a whole.

As with the first edition, ‘Process’ sprang out of an idea to explore these themes and unveil identity design’s complexity. “The purpose is to reveal how physical sketching intertwines with critical thinking in the creative process, well beyond theoretical design jargon,” adds the publisher.

What we get is an uncensored, behind the scenes of logo marks and identity design. Displaying all of the impulses, divergent thoughts and blind alleys which the work of humans entails, Process – Visual Journeys in Graphic Design (Second Edition) is available to order now from Counterprint for £25.

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