If you were to open your cleaning closet, how many bottles would you find? Detergents? Bleach? Softener? Lysol? Not only does it clutter the space but it is also inefficient – have you ever had a Tide bottle fall on you while reaching out to get the soap? I can confirm its not pretty. Also, not everyone or every brand provides refills so all you are doing is going through an endless consumption cycle that is generating more waste. Clean surfaces but not a clean planet. Rena is a conceptual bottle designed to specifically solve the above issue – one bottle fits all!

Rena’s aim was to create an innovative bottle that could be a bank for all the cleaning liquids we needed. It has a reservoir tank and replaceable cartridge that holds concentrated chemicals that are mixed and diluted in specific ratios to clean different surfaces or dispense for laundry. It takes the guesswork out so that your surfaces and clothes are protected from your chemical calculations (let’s be real, ‘one cap’ is not a measurement). The bottle has an ergonomic design and using it is simple – insert the cartridge, fill in the water, select the surface you intend to clean on your Rena mobile app, and via Bluetooth the bottle will collect that data configure a detergent mix based on it. Then all you do is press the trigger and the bottle will dispense the concoction. I can only imagine Monica Geller screaming if she saw this.

Cartridges are created to be refillable to reduce landfill waste and can be customized by the brand. The chemicals are pressurized which makes it easy to move it into the mixing chamber without a pump. The safety mechanism makes sure the chemicals are not dispensed if the cartridge is not inserted in Rena. It also features a DC pump instead of the traditional pump and a 750 ml water tank. And lastly, it is rechargeable so no need to scrimmage through your junk drawers to find spare batteries. The universal detergent bottle makes cleaning more efficient, safe, and easier on the environment. Long road ahead but designs like Rena gives us a good headstart!

Designer: James Lord

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