From quaint wooden cabins to floating mansions – the world of architecture is always thriving and evolving! It is anything, BUT boring. The scope of architectural structures today is unlimited, and it’s evident in the arsenal of builds we featured on YD, in the month of July! From mushroom-shaped duplex villas to provide the ultimate glamping experience to an A-shaped, self-sustaining and climate-smart cabin – we were delighted by the influx and variety of designs we got to witness, and present to you guys!  And, we’ve curated the best of the lot for you! These mesmerizing designs will challenge what you believe are the boundaries and norms of modern-day architecture, widening not only your vision for it but also providing you with massive inspiration. Enjoy!

1. Atri

Designed by a company called Naturvillan, Atri is a newly built A-frame villa located on the shores of Lake Vänern. The self-sustaining and climate-smart home is like a sustainable greenhouse in the middle of the mountains! It provides stunning views of the lake, as well as of the surrounding majestic trees, and a natural plot with rock slabs.

Why is it noteworthy?

It is A-shaped with a stable base directly on the mountain and has a continuous axis so you can see through the whole house in one view. As you look up the house blends in among the trees, becoming part of the natural landscape.

What we like

  • Self-sustaining and sustainable
  • Climate-smart

What we dislike

  • No complaints!

2. The Mushroom Villa

The Mushroom Villa is a wonderfully idyllic holiday home that gives you a cozy space to unwind in.

Why is it noteworthy?

Located right in the midst of nature, the villa is made entirely from bamboo (one of architect Thilina Liyanage’s signature materials) with terracotta tiles on the roof to keep you cool during the days. Practically cut off from civilization, the villa’s roofs also come dotted with solar panels that help power your glamping experience!

What we like

  • A mushroom-cap-shaped roof on top comes with 14 solar panels that power the villa

What we dislike

  • No complaints!

3. The Coodo

Mark Dare Schmiedel came across a mobile home concept designed by a group of Slovenian architects called ‘Coodo’. Schmiedel went on to procure the design rights of the concept, through his company LTG Lofts to Go and kickstarted the production of the units. The modular homes aim to bring you closer to nature, to a space away from the crowds, where you can truly enjoy the beauty of a moment.

Why is it noteworthy?

It features a curved and minimal steel frame with rounded edges and stunning floor-to-ceiling glass walls. The beautiful glass walls allow a generous stream of sunlight to enter the home. Whether on rooftops in the city, beaches, mountains or alongside a river, the Coodo can be easily installed almost anywhere. The outer shell is crafted from glass fiber-reinforced steel, while the interiors are smooth, minimalistic, and seamless. The inner wall artfully hides the heating, cooling, and power systems creating a harmonious living space.

What we like

  • Integrated utilization of smart home technology and adherence to Passive House standards
  • Can be stacked one on top of the other

What we dislike

  • No complaints!

4. Urban Camp

A portable, easy-to-build, and economical building system that recently caught our eye is a project titled ‘Urban Camp’. Designed and envisioned by Brazilian architect Felipe Campolina, the interesting project was proposed for the ‘Micro Housing 2022’ contest held by Impact Design Competitions.

Why is it noteworthy?

This affordable housing solution aims to transform parking lots into modern habitats for those seeking temporary or permanent refuge/housing. Each micro home can be assembled effortlessly in DIY molds and measures 5.4m x 6m with a surface area of 32.4m². It can accommodate up to 4 people or more with ease.

What we like

  • Affordable and DIY housing solution

What we dislike

  • No complaints!

5. The Maldives Floating City

The Maldives Floating City is the world’s first of its kind with thousands of houses and complete governmental support. Houses within this unique floating framework are open not just to Maldivians, but also to the international community who can invest in residential permits and own houses within the city.

Why is it noteworthy?

Uniquely enough, every home will be a waterfront home, given the city’s coral-inspired layout, allowing all residents to be just mere feet away from the pristine waters of the Indian Ocean. The city, with its 5,000 houses will also have hotels, shops, and restaurants, and will be connected to Malé via water-based transport (the floating city is just 10 minutes away)

What we like

  • The city will rely on green/blue energy and a smart grid will help distribute power between units
  • Features self-sustainable facilities

What we dislike

  • No complaints!

6. The Line

A lot of sci-fi movies set in the future have all these amazing-looking skyscrapers and modern cities that we think are still years into the future and may not even happen in our lifetime. But the future may not be as far off as we think, especially if these plans for a linear city in Saudi Arabia will push through, then we’re just a step away from cities like that we see in the movies. Well, we still won’t have flying cars probably, but that may also be just a few years away.

Why is it noteworthy?

The Line is a megastructure that will be built as part of the Neom development in the Tabuk province in Saudi Arabia, near the Red Sea and across the Gulf of Aqaba. Neom will be a tourist destination and city with smart city technologies and sustainable structures and The Line will be part of this development. It is a 500-meter tall and 200-meter wide linear city that will occupy 170 kilometers across the planned city.

What we like

  • Will be the 12th highest structure in the world

What we dislike

  • No complaints!

7. The SEED Room

Originally, the SEED Room was created to be part of the Trees Breathing Experience, located in a forest of Paulownia trees. The trees are connected to IoT sensors so they can track how these trees, which trap 50 tons of CO2 every year, have impacted the real world.

Why is it noteworthy?

The sensors send the data to machine-learning algorithms, arranged as digital avatars in blockchain, and then displayed in the pods where people can stay in the forest.

What we like

  • Eco-sustainable
  • Made from the Paulownia trees that surround the pod

What we dislike

  • No complaints!

8. Koja

Polestar is known for its electric vehicles (EV) but they have now also created a “spaceship hut” in the middle of a Finnish forest. Koja is minimalist but futuristic looking and allows its occupants to immerse themselves in nature while still enjoying the safety and comfort of an enclosed space

Why is it noteworthy?

It looks like a treehouse but with a more immersive design. It is described as a ‘spaceship in the forest” with only a miniature space to fit in two people.

What we like

  • Reinforced with an iron frame to make sure it won’t drop you to the ground

What we dislike

  • No complaints!

9. REVIVAL

Modular houses and buildings aren’t a novel concept, but most of the time, these are designed with convenience, economy, and space efficiency in mind. While those elements are beneficial in any situation, rebuilding destroyed structures to provide immediate housing and emergency facilities has a different set of priorities. Buildings have to be set up quickly to fill certain needs, but they also need to be flexible so that the same buildings can be used for other purposes once those needs pass.

Why is it noteworthy?

REVIVAL is an architectural design concept that tries to address these particular needs by using a block system. Each block has a collapsible design that starts with a steel frame. At first glance, it actually looks more like a typical shipping container, and they do share some similarities in basic shape. Unlike a container, however, REVIVAL blocks have wall slabs that are made with an aluminum frame and filled with insulation like mineral wool.

What we like

  • Modular system that can be expanded and shrunk as needed

What we dislike

  • No complaints!

10. Raus’ Cabin

If you live in Berlin or a city near the German capital, you can avail of Raus’ service which lets you book secluded cabins whose locations are revealed to you once you’ve booked them. Their newest cabin design is as compact as they come but with a bit of a charred twist.

Why is it noteworthy?

This new compact cabin was built on the grounds of Wehrmühle Biesenthal which is just an hour away from Berlin. The 193-square-foot cabin is made from charred timber, giving it a dark and worn look that lets it blend with the dark tree trunks that surround it. It actually sits in the middle of a forest with meadows, fields, and even a small river surrounding it. You are basically escaping to nature but with all the conveniences of a stylish cabin to retreat to.

What we like

  • Self-sufficient cabins
  • Solar panels to provide the space with green energy

What we dislike

  • No complaints!

The post Top 10 architectural picks of July 2022 first appeared on Yanko Design.

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