3D scanning has traditionally been the domain of big production studios and companies because of the size of the equipment and their prohibitive costs. With the arrival of handheld scanners, however, the doors were thrown wide open for anyone in any field to make their own 3D models from real-world objects, whether it’s for fun, art, health, or profit.

Typical handheld 3D scanners work great when working with small objects that are no larger than the device itself. Of course, real-world objects like car parts, whole vehicles, and even human bodies are quite big and push these smaller scanners to the limit. Enter the new Revopont RANGE 2, the latest in a line of lightweight but powerful 3D scanners designed to handle large objects without breaking a sweat, making sure that your creativity and productivity aren’t limited by the size of your model.

Designer: Revopoint Team

Click Here to Buy Now: $656.10 $729 (10% off, use coupon code “YKD10”). Hurry, deal ends in 48 hours!

Revopoint RANGE 2 is a portable handheld dual depth camera structured infrared light 3D scanner designed for capturing large objects like furniture, people, and vehicles.

Because handheld 3D scanners work by guiding the depth cameras across and around the target, the devices need to be able to capture a great amount of detail with great depth quickly and steadily with accuracy and precision. That’s a rather tall order for a small device, especially one that is made to be accessible to both amateurs and pros alike, but Revopoint’s expertise really shines through with the upgrades that its RANGE 2 3D scanner packs in a compact and portable form. For example, thanks to new depth cameras that have double the sensor size, the Revopoint RANGE 2 can work on a distance ranging from 400 mm to 1,300 mm, a 60% increase that makes it even faster to capture large objects compared to the previous generation, and can scan an area up to 860 x 1380 mm in size.

Scan of the body by Revopoint RANGE 2. Image credit: PUTV

Range isn’t the only thing that’s bigger and better on the RANGE 2, of course. Four flash LEDs banish shadows for a more uniform color capture, while an improved RGB camera with a bigger aperture is able to capture more color information, ensuring clear color capture with higher levels of detail for more accurate textures and realistic-looking 3D models. An upgraded tracking system utilizes the device’s built-in 9-axis IMU (Inertial Measuring Unit) to keep the scan steady even if your hands aren’t. Four Infrared LED fill lights also make it easier to recognize markers, resulting in more accurate frame stitching in marker mode.

Angel Candelabra scanned with Revopoint RANGE 2. Image credit: dfodaro

Thanks to these powerful features, the Revopoint RANGE 2 is even more versatile and as flexible as before. With Wi-Fi 6 and USB-C connections, you can be assured that transmitting critical data will be fast and stable. As before, the scanner is compatible with Windows, macOS, Android, and iOS devices, functioning in handheld mode or set on a stand in front of a turntable. And with the Revo Scan 5 software, the scanning process couldn’t be easier, especially with post-processing features, such as frame editing, hole filling, overlap detection, etc, to enhance your workflow.

With the Revopoint RANGE 2 3D scanner, you have a whole new world of large objects you will be able to scan. You can easily scan car or mechanical parts, offering a cost-effective and high-performance way to study them through reverse engineering or produce replacements. Archaeologists, scientists, and museum creators can now also digitize artifacts to preserve them for posterity or turn them into XR experiences. And, of course, artists and creators now have a portable yet powerful tool to bring their ideas to life. Scanning big objects for your big projects will no longer be a problem with the new and improved Revopoint RANGE 2!

Click Here to Buy Now: $656.10 $729 (10% off, use coupon code “YKD10”). Hurry, deal ends in 48 hours!

The post Revopoint RANGE 2 3D scanner makes short work of scanning large objects first appeared on Yanko Design.

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