Read about the full shortlist in The Retail Space category at the 2023 INDE.Awards.

The organic curves of rounded architectural and decorative design lend a handcrafted and softened aesthetic that fits well with the nurturing cocoon of retail spaces. Explored as both repeating motif and grand gesture, these softened edges and smooth expanses create a welcoming, gentle environment on one hand and a dynamic pop of visual movement on the other. What makes these projects exceptional is the degree of integration. These are not curves added at the end; rather, they are foundational to the fabric with flow, visual impact and beauty clearly and intentionally articulated.

1. Hazens ARK Center, China by Woods Bagot

Contained by curved mezzanine balconies, the sinuous form of the spiral staircase is anchored by the ephemeral curves of an organic-formed sculptural artwork. Creating the design by pushing and pulling the volumes of the mass as negative and positive spaces, the three interlocking volumes represent different regeneration stages of the entire masterplan development.

5 of the most deliciously curvaceous retail spaces in 2023
Photograph by CreatAR.

2. Ethereal Cave, Malaysia by Spaceman

Paying homage to Clef’s very first product, the facial sheet mask, the simple form has been interpreting spatially as rhythm and texture. The three-dimensional curved surfaces made by soft white layers of fabric hanging side-by-side create a monochromatic environment that is surreal, transportive and far away from the familiar. The interplay between the minimal aesthetic and the free-flowing form of the blinds transforms the space into an unexpected environment, creating a holistic and ethereal expression for the brand.

5 of the most deliciously curvaceous retail spaces in 2023
Photograph by David Yeow Photography.

3. Mimco Flagship Store, Australia by Studio Doherty

The new flagship store of Mimco showcases a stripped-back palette, bold architectural curves, intricate detailing, and layered materiality, which are a tribute to the brand’s history and development. The use of curved, sculptural forms was a defining feature, from the grand green arch that greets customers at the entrance to the undulating walls with rounded plinths that guide them throughout the store. These plinths were designed to serve dual purpose as display opportunities for bags and accessories, while also providing a subtle means of guiding customers through the space.

5 of the most deliciously curvaceous retail spaces in 2023
Photograph by Timothy Kaye.

4. Twomorrow Jewellery, Singapore by Right Angle Studio

Curated to echo the essence of the brand, each element within the design is curved. From the arched windows and doorways to rugs, lounged and plinths, curves are subtly woven into the design as a direct response to the tunnelled staircase located at the mezzanine. Pairing Fritz Hansen, Serralunga, Olta furnishings, the tonal shifts across neutral and grey are enlivened by the curving forms and softened form of the diamond.

5 of the most deliciously curvaceous retail spaces in 2023
Photography by Studio Periphery.

5. Casa de Zanotta, China by HAS design and research

Taking its cues from the unique stone forest in Anhui, the design seeks to mirror the idea of the forest. To this end, three circular volumes extending outwards not only provide more natural light for the indoor space but also blur the boundaries between the indoor and outdoor architecture. The design implies the integration of an artificial stone forest and natural light to repair the natural texture of a busy city through architectural space and seasonal landscape.

5 of the most deliciously curvaceous retail spaces in 2023
Photograph by Su Shengliang, Schran Image.

Full details of The Retail Space category at this year’s INDE.Awards are available here and we think you might also like this story on five of the best examples of lighting in hospitality projects for 2023.

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