As a sustainable material with practical and aesthetic benefits, timber is ever popular as an architectural and design material. As leaders in the Australian market and well established in the supply of high quality solid-engineered oak flooring, Tongue & Groove has undergone a significant rebrand focused on user experience and sustainability. 

Timber, of course, is naturally sustainable in the sense that it grows – but it requires conscientious management to ensure that it’s responsibly sourced and to minimise waste. Tongue & Groove has placed this commitment at the heart what it does, setting new industry standards for best practice in material sourcing, waste and emission minimisation. This care and respect for the timber extends throughout the manufacturing process with Tongue & Groove’s new standard of engineered flooring that uses up to 70 per cent repurposed materials.

Alongside this renewed commitment to sustainability and quality is a whole new level of interactive support for clients – from detailed product sheets and drawings to a range of flooring patterns that can be downloaded to use in architectural drawings and renderings.

Visitors to Tongue & Groove’s redesigned website will find a useful and empowering visualiser tool that enables users to explore the impact of different products, including width, grade and colour, in an interior space.

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Visualisation is fundamentally important to the process of design as it allows the various stakeholders in a project – client, interior designer, architect, builder – to express their ideas, to see those of others and, ultimately, to develop them in collaboration. Tongue & Groove’s new tools and resources facilitate a smoother and more informed design process supporting design professionals in realising their most ambitious creative visions.

That reverence for the material is vital, and part of the charm of timber is the felt connection between the finished product and the natural form taken from a tree. That Tongue & Groove has chosen to feature on its website beautiful, sculptural pieces closer to nature – as opposed to just flooring – is testament to this appreciation for timber in all its dimensions.

“Noble, natural and strong.” Three defining qualities reflecting the unique three-layered solid oak construction that defines Tongue and groove structure. The result is a board with unmatched size, strength, and durability. Available in lengths up to five metres, it can be used in applications beyond flooring such as stairs, joinery, walls and ceilings.

On one hand, novelty in the form of interactive visualisation; on the other, a return to the timeless qualities of timber. It is newness and renewal at one and the same time – the same noble material, the same commitment to quality, structural performance and design excellence. New tools allow the same historic, reliable material to be used in ever more nuanced ways. 

Tongue & Groove
tongueandgroove.com.au

Photography
Courtesy of Tongue & Groove

Rose Bay House by PopovBass Architects, photography by Pablo Veiga.
Phoenix House by Harley Graham, photography by Andy Macpherson Studio.

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