Achieving high-speed travel on the water can either be possible with a very powerful engine or the ability to ride on the waves creating the least resistance. The latter is already demonstrated by hydrofoil boats, and adopting this same technology for a yacht promises high-speed travel in style.

Lazzarini Design Studio is already renowned for its future-forward prototypes or concept designs, and once again they steer away from anything average. This is the Plectrum superyacht that minuscules anything riding on hydrofoils currently, and by a fair margin, to put it modestly. Provided everything goes as planned, the vessel should make it past the drawing boards into the production lines by 2025.

Designer: Lazzarini Design Studio

The 74-meter yacht concept inspired by the American cup sailing yachts is an ambitious design given the complexities of the hydrofoil technology. No wonder such boats with this tech are currently very rare, since they lift over the waterline at certain speeds to reduce drag and friction. Just imagine, the amount of thrust required for the foil cant systems to lift the movable arms without creating any complications. To keep the dry weight of the superyacht down to a minimum, Lazzarini proposes using carbon fiber composite material.

Plectrum is propelled by a trio of hydrogen-powered motors to generate a mind-boggling 15,000hp. The adjustable foil beams measure 15 meters in anchored mode, and extend to 20 meters when the vessel is lifted at a top speed of 75 knots. This promises comfortable sea traveling for pan-continent journeys, unlike anything we’ve seen so far. For the opulent guests, there’s more than enough room for a luxurious stay and a huge sundeck for baking in the sun. There are four main levels, six guest cabins housed in the body and an expansive shipowner suite. The Italian design studio imagines Plectrum to come with a central garage, rear garage for watercrafts and a helicopter hangar too!

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