Tom Fereday Studio Shots Australian Design Photo Sean Fennessey Yellowtrace 01Tom at work in his Camperdown studio. Photo by Sean Fennessey.

 

Tom Fereday Studio Shots Australian Design Photo Sean Fennessey Yellowtrace 04Photo by Sean Fennessey.

 

Tom Fereday Studio Shots Australian Design Photo Sean Fennessey Yellowtrace 05Photo by Sean Fennessey.

 

Tom Fereday Studio Shots Australian Design Photo Sean Fennessey Yellowtrace 06The Sana Vase from Tom’s first homewares collection, made from cast crystal glass. Photo by Sean Fennessey.

 

Tom Fereday Studio Shots Australian Design Photo Sean Fennessey Yellowtrace 02The Bow Chair at home in Tom’s studio. Photo by Sean Fennessey.

Tom Fereday Studio Shots Australian Design Photo Sean Fennessey Yellowtrace 03The Wes Lounge 2015—named after the always elegant Wes Anderson. Photo by Sean Fennessey.

 

A unique figure in today’s design landscape with his star on the rise, Tom Fereday develops furniture and objects through a process of inquiry and collaboration. Fascinated by the tension that lies between natural materials and contemporary design and manufacture, the Sydney-based industrial designer seeks to create something honest and enduring in everything he touches.

Working at every stage of design, from concept through to production and development alongside skilled makers and brands, Tom interrogates the role objects play in today’s world. The designer works with new innovations with the intention to elevate the essential beauty of both material and form rather than take away from it. “At its essence, I am trying to create a body of work that grows, that is not replaced and may last a lifetime or longer,” Tom says.

For such a young designer, he’s already collaborated with some of the best local and international institutions and brands, including bespoke commissions for Louis Vuitton and The Art Gallery of New South Wales—and he’s only just getting started. His latest collaboration with Agglomerati, Cor, presented at this year’s Milan Design Week speaks to a design ethos underpinned by raw and natural materials. The series of towering, illuminated sculptures each exude a gravity that speaks to the fundamental nature of stone.

It’s not the first time he’s joined us in the Yellowtrace hot seat. We first interviewed Tom way back in 2014, fresh after he opened his first practice. Ten years on, and with a second outpost in London in the works, we thought it was about time we checked back in. Spoiler alert—he’s killing it!

 

This Yellowtrace Promotion is supported by Tom Fereday. Like everything we do, our partner content is carefully curated to maintain the utmost relevance to our audience. Thank you for supporting the brands that support Yellowtrace.

 

DISCOVER MORE

 

Tom Fereday Art Gallery Chair Australian Furniture Design Photo Sean Fennesey Yellowtrace 01

The Art Gallery Chair, designed for the Art Gallery of New South Wales in 2022. Inspired by the gallery the reading chair can be found in the public gallery member lounge and library (and can now be yours too, available for sale on Tom’s website). Photo by Sean Fennessey.

 

Tom Fereday Art Gallery Chair Australian Furniture Design Photo Sean Fennesey Yellowtrace 02Tom’s Art Gallery chair on the way to see the Archibald Prize. Photo by Sean Fennessey.

 

Tom Fereday Agnsw Library Australian Furniture Design Photo Cieran Murphey Yellowtrace 03Looking chic in the AGNSW member’s library. Photo by Cieran Murphey.

 

Tom Fereday Art Gallery Chair Australian Furniture Design Photo Courtesy Tom Fereday Yellowtrace 04Mid-production shot. Photo courtesy of Tom Fereday.

 

Tom Fereday Art Gallery Chair Australian Furniture Design Photo Sean Fennesey Yellowtrace 06Photo by Sean Fennessey.

 

Tom Fereday Art Gallery Chair Australian Furniture Design Photo Sean Fennesey Yellowtrace 07Photo by Sean Fennessey.

Tom Fereday Art Gallery Chair Australian Furniture Design Photo Sean Fennesey Yellowtrace 08Photo by Sean Fennessey.

 

Hey Tom, welcome back to Yellowtrace! Could you please briefly tell us about yourself – how did you develop your love for design and the path that led you to establish your studio?

I am a furniture and product designer based in Sydney & London with a design approach built around the celebration of natural materials. I was born in Australia but grew up in London, England studying sculpture at the Wimbledon School of Art before moving to Australia to complete honours in Industrial Design at the University of Technology Sydney.

I think my love for design began as a young designer experimenting with model making and genuinely enjoying just quietly constructing objects from available materials to create items with a sense of character or value. I think I have always had a certain naïve intuitive love of objects even when I was not necessarily aware that people actually designed them.

 

Tom Fereday Arc Studio Chair Photo Anson Smart Yellowtrace 07

The Arc Outdoor Chair for Eco 2021 juxtaposes raw cast aluminium with natural canvas. Celebrating unfinished natural materials and production processes is a great distillation of the ethos behind Tom’s work. Photo by Anson Smart.

 

Tom Fereday Arc Studio Chair Photo Anson Smart Yellowtrace 08The (original) Arc Studio Chair with leather seat pad. Photo by Anson Smart.

 

Tom Fereday Arc Studio Chair Photo Courtesy Tom Fereday Yellowtrace 09Photo courtesy of Tom Fereday.

 

Tom Fereday Suono Speaker Australian Product Design Photo Fiona Susanto Yellowtrace 10It’s not just his furniture that is beautiful, case in point is his Suono Speaker seen above. Photo by Fiona Susanto.

 

Is there something that’s fundamental to your practice, your philosophy and your process?

I try to celebrate the natural beauty of materials through unique designs with the intended outcome of both aesthetic and functional longevity. At its essence I am trying to create a body of work that grows and is not replaced, that may last a lifetime or longer. I term this as quiet innovation to mean developing or working with new design innovation that does not take away from its essential beauty of both material or form.

How do you describe your design sensibility and your aesthetic?

I would say my work is considered, it is built upon a functional concept or problem that I try to solve in the most beautiful way possible. Built on the principle of honest design I try to celebrate the materials and manufacture behind furniture and objects, guiding considered and thoughtful design outcomes that are considered from every angle and made with nothing to hide.

 

Tom Fereday Cor Agglomerati Alcova Photo Alejandro Ramirez Orozco Yellowtrace 11

Cor Light for Agglomerati, presented at Alcova for Milan Design Week 2023. The collection comprises six monolithic totems made from Roman travertine. Photo by Alejandro Ramirez Orozco.

 

Tom Fereday Cor Agglomerati Alcova Photo Alejandro Ramirez Orozco Yellowtrace 12Photo by Alejandro Ramirez Orozco.

 

How do you go about establishing a concept and an overall direction for your pieces/ collections?

Ultimately my goal is to create objects with both aesthetic and functional longevity that grow on you over time, this often leading to quiet considered pieces that upon closer inspection reveal their design consideration or nuance. I try to make genuinely meaningful objects that warrant the investment and energy that must be placed into creating them. It is very important to me that the works we create solve a problem or need and do so in a way that is both sympathetic to the materials and functionally elegant.

Your work feels very material-driven. Can you tell us a bit about this and how this guides your design process?

I think the beauty and character of natural materials are both incredible and meaningful to people. I am often trying to celebrate the natural characteristics of natural materials to not overwork a design rather enhance the material and experiential interaction with an object. If you stop to appreciate just how incredible it is that a piece of timber of stone came about I think is only right that we garner as much respect and careful consideration as possible to its ultimate use.

 

Tom Fereday Cove Aluminium Australian Furniture Design Photo Pier Carthew Yellowtrace 13

Cove Aluminium limited edition lounge chair, designed for his joint Melbourne Design Week 2023 show VERSA with Melbourne designer Charlie White. Photo by Pier Carthew.

 

Tom Fereday Cove Aluminium Australian Furniture Design Photo Sean Fennessey Yellowtrace 15Photo by Sean Fennessey.

 

Tom Fereday Cove Aluminium Australian Furniture Design Photo Pier Carthew Yellowtrace 14Photo by Pier Carthew.

 

Tom Fereday Cove Australian Furniture Design Photo Tim Robinson Yellowtrace 16Cove Lounge for Sydney Design Week 2022. Photo by Tim Robinson.

 

Tom Fereday Cove Australian Furniture Design Photo Tim Robinson Yellowtrace 17 CropPhoto by Tim Robinson.

 

Tom Fereday Louis Vuitton Collaboration Photo Courtesy Tom Fereday Yellowtrace 18Photo courtesy of Tom Fereday.

 

Tom Fereday Louis Vuitton Collaboration Photo Courtesy Tom Fereday Yellowtrace 19

Louis Vuitton No.2 for Edition 2019. A collaboration with Louis Vuitton to produce bespoke furniture for their entire Sydney store (a pretty huge deal!). Photo courtesy of Tom Fereday.

 

Click to read full article & see all images

| The article Furniture & Product Designer Tom Fereday on Creating a Body of Work that Grows & Lasts a Lifetime. appeared first on Yellowtrace. |

©